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Sexual Violence Laws In Eurasia: Towards a consent-based definition

This report examines legal provisions relating to sexual violence in five Eurasian countries – Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. The research identifies shortfalls in ways that sexual violence crimes are defined under the law and highlights how existing laws are being poorly enacted throughout these criminal justice systems. Amendments to these provisions are suggested, as well as ways, pending legal reform, in which the current provisions could be interpreted to ensure effective compliance with international and regional human rights standards which are binding on the States under review. Explore:

  • an overview of international and regional standards and best practices for how sexual violence offences should be defined and interpreted
  • the definitions of sexual violence crimes under the national laws of Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan and underlines the challenges in implementing these provisions
  • how existing legislation in these countries should be amended to comply with regional and international human rights standards and explains how current legislation could be interpreted to ensure better access to justice for victims/survivors now.

Russian and Georgian versions coming soon.

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