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We are fighting to ensure that women are unequivocally free from sexual harassment and violence in the workplace.

Women are often quietly expected, or forced, to endure unwanted and offensive behavior, have sex or be raped in the workplace. This has been an unstated requirement to get an interview, keep a job or be promoted.

122 countries have passed laws against ‘sexual harassment’ in the workplace since the term was coined in 1975.  68 countries have not, leaving 235 million women working in there without legal recourse. Even in countries that do have laws in place (like the United States), harassment and rape culture is pervasive. Companies usually approach these laws from a perspective that ensures legal compliance and confidentiality rather than a correction of institutional and employee behavior.

In 2016, the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued a provocative report on harassment in the workplace and concluded the system is failing.

Instead, victims chose to avoid the harasser, deny or downplay the gravity of the situation, or try to forget, ignore or endure the harassment.  What to do if you’ve been harassed: https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/newsroom/wysk/harassed_at_work.cfm

Harassment behavior, mainly by men targeting women, continues unchallenged. But recently, more women and men are speaking out against the daily harassment and aggression they experience. The #MeToo social media campaign, following allegations against Harvey Weinstein and corporations Uber and Google, underscores the issue as global  and pervasive across all levels of the private sector. The business case for companies to effectively tackle sexual harassment is clear - through the EEOC’s administrative enforcement pre-litigation process alone, employers have paid nearly $700 million to employees alleging harassment in 2010 - 2015.

Workplace culture and the attitude of senior management have the greatest impact in establishing workplaces where sexual harassment and assault are not tolerated, and women feel free to speak up when they are subject to unwelcome or harassing conduct. Changing workplace culture is critical to ending sexual harassment and assault in the workplace.

It’s On Us

The It's On Us campaign to Protect Students from Sexual Assault on colleges and high school campuses is based on the need to change the cultures of educational institutions. The It's On Us campaign calls upon everyone to do his or her part to be a part of the solution based on the premise that sexual assault is not just about a victim and a perpetrator.

The EEOC seeks everyone’s assistance to launch an  It's On Us campaign to stop sexual harassment in the workplace  - transforming all workplaces across our country – to places in which co-workers, supervisors, clients, and customers all have roles to play in stopping harassment.

Take Action!

Please join Equality Now in standing with all who have experienced sexual harassment or rape in the workplace by calling upon the EEOC to implement the recommendations in their report and launch the It’s On Us campaign to end Sexual Harassment in the Workplace.

Resources for Employers:

EEOC Training Program On Respectful Workplaces https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/newsroom/release/10-4-17.cfm

Thank you for your support!  

Target:

Victoria A. Lipnic
Acting Chair, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Email: Victoria.Lipnic@eeoc.gov ( must test)
Twitter: @USEEOC
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/USEEOC/

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USA: End Sexual Harassment in the Workplace
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Dear Acting Chair Victoria Lipnic,

I am concerned about the increasing reports of sexual harassment in the workplace which are  coming to light. The #MeToo social media campaign highlighted just how widespread the problem is across the country. I am glad that the EEOC has taken the lead on this issue with its 2016 Report of the Co-Chairs of the EEOC Select Task Force on the Study of Harassment in the Workplace that provided important recommendations on ending harassment in the workplace.

However, some of the statistics quoted in your report were deeply concerning, particularly the fact that 90% of individuals who report harassment never take formal action against the harassment. The reluctance of individuals to take action is understandable, since your report also indicates that up to 75% of those who spoke out faced some sort of retaliation. This indicates that a serious reboot of our efforts to combat sexual harassment in the workplace is required. I entirely agree with your recommendation that the EEOC should launch an It’s on Us campaign in workplaces across the country to end harassment in the workplace.

It is time to implement these recommendations and take decisive steps to change the toxic workplace culture which fails to adequately prevent and deal with instances of sexual harassment. I’m calling on your leadership to ensure that the EEOC implements the recommendations in its 2016 report, particularly regarding the launch of the It’s on Us campaign.

Yours sincerely,

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25594
Action Date: 
Saturday, November 25, 2017
Action Status: 
Letters Sent (Auto): 
308
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We are fighting to ensure that women are unequivocally free from sexual harassment and violence in the workplace.

Women are often quietly expected, or forced, to endure unwanted and offensive behavior, have sex or be raped in the workplace. This has been an unstated requirement to get an interview, keep a job or be promoted.

122 countries have passed laws against ‘sexual harassment’ in the workplace since the term was coined in 1975.  68 countries have not, leaving 235 million women working in there without legal recourse. Even in countries that do have laws in place (like the United States), harassment and rape culture is pervasive. Companies usually approach these laws from a perspective that ensures legal compliance and confidentiality rather than a correction of institutional and employee behavior.

In 2016, the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued a provocative report on harassment in the workplace and concluded the system is failing.

Instead, victims chose to avoid the harasser, deny or downplay the gravity of the situation, or try to forget, ignore or endure the harassment.  What to do if you’ve been harassed: https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/newsroom/wysk/harassed_at_work.cfm

Harassment behavior, mainly by men targeting women, continues unchallenged. But recently, more women and men are speaking out against the daily harassment and aggression they experience. The #MeToo social media campaign, following allegations against Harvey Weinstein and corporations Uber and Google, underscores the issue as global  and pervasive across all levels of the private sector. The business case for companies to effectively tackle sexual harassment is clear - through the EEOC’s administrative enforcement pre-litigation process alone, employers have paid nearly $700 million to employees alleging harassment in 2010 - 2015.

Workplace culture and the attitude of senior management have the greatest impact in establishing workplaces where sexual harassment and assault are not tolerated, and women feel free to speak up when they are subject to unwelcome or harassing conduct. Changing workplace culture is critical to ending sexual harassment and assault in the workplace.

It’s On Us

The It's On Us campaign to Protect Students from Sexual Assault on colleges and high school campuses is based on the need to change the cultures of educational institutions. The It's On Us campaign calls upon everyone to do his or her part to be a part of the solution based on the premise that sexual assault is not just about a victim and a perpetrator.

The EEOC seeks everyone’s assistance to launch an  It's On Us campaign to stop sexual harassment in the workplace  - transforming all workplaces across our country – to places in which co-workers, supervisors, clients, and customers all have roles to play in stopping harassment.

Take Action!

Please join Equality Now in standing with all who have experienced sexual harassment or rape in the workplace by calling upon the EEOC to implement the recommendations in their report and launch the It’s On Us campaign to end Sexual Harassment in the Workplace.

Resources for Employers:

EEOC Training Program On Respectful Workplaces https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/newsroom/release/10-4-17.cfm

Thank you for your support!  

Target:

Victoria A. Lipnic
Acting Chair, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Email: Victoria.Lipnic@eeoc.gov ( must test)
Twitter: @USEEOC
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/USEEOC/

Dear Acting Chair Victoria Lipnic,

I am concerned about the increasing reports of sexual harassment in the workplace which are  coming to light. The #MeToo social media campaign highlighted just how widespread the problem is across the country. I am glad that the EEOC has taken the lead on this issue with its 2016 Report of the Co-Chairs of the EEOC Select Task Force on the Study of Harassment in the Workplace that provided important recommendations on ending harassment in the workplace.

However, some of the statistics quoted in your report were deeply concerning, particularly the fact that 90% of individuals who report harassment never take formal action against the harassment. The reluctance of individuals to take action is understandable, since your report also indicates that up to 75% of those who spoke out faced some sort of retaliation. This indicates that a serious reboot of our efforts to combat sexual harassment in the workplace is required. I entirely agree with your recommendation that the EEOC should launch an It’s on Us campaign in workplaces across the country to end harassment in the workplace.

It is time to implement these recommendations and take decisive steps to change the toxic workplace culture which fails to adequately prevent and deal with instances of sexual harassment. I’m calling on your leadership to ensure that the EEOC implements the recommendations in its 2016 report, particularly regarding the launch of the It’s on Us campaign.

Yours sincerely,

TAKE ACTION

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