Security council resolution 1325

Global: Include women in the Syrian peacebuilding process now!

Update: 
Not an update
Date: 
2013 Dec 19

16 JANUARY 2014 UPDATE: Despite persistent efforts from both inside and outside Syria, women have not been guaranteed a spot at in the upcoming Geneva II peace talks, scheduled to begin 22 January 2014.

What You Can Do: 

TAKE ACTION NOW! << Click on this link to send all letters below online.

Please join Equality Now and the Syrian Women’s Forum for Peace in calling for gender sensitive peacebuilding in Syria and holding the UN, Russia and the US accountable to their commitments to include women and civil society in all Syrian peace processes.

1)  Call on UN & Arab League Special Envoy to Syria, Lakhdar Brahimi, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, and Russian President, Vladmir Putin, to implement UNSCR 1325 and honor their commitment to make women in the Syrian peace process a priority.

H.E. Ban Ki-moon
Secretary-General
United Nations, S-3800
New York, NY 10017
USA
Email: sg@un.org
Fax: +1 212-963-2155

Mr. Lakhdar Brahimi
Joint Special Representative of the UN & the League of Arab States for Syria
Email: Brahimi@un.org
Khawla Mattar, Spokesperson for Mr. Brahimi
Email: khwala.mattar@unic-eg.org

Vladimir Putin
President of Russia
23, Ilyinka Street
Moscow, 103132
Russia
Email via webform: http://eng.letters.kremlin.ru/send

2)  Call on President Obama and Secretary Kerry to honor their commitment in the US NAP on Women Peace and Security to make Syrian women a priority in the peace process.

President Obama
White House
1600 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20500
USA
Phone: 202 456-1111
Email: http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/submit-questions-and-comments
BRhodes@nss.eop.gov  (Ben Rhodes, Foreign Policy Advisor to President Obama)

John Kerry, Secretary of State
US Department of State
2201 C Street NW
Washington, DC 20520
USA
Phone: 202 647-5291
Email: kerryj@state.gov

With a copy to:
Ambassador Russell
Department of State
Global Office for Women’s Issues
2201 C Street NW
Washington, DC 20520
USA
Email: Russellk@state.gov

3)  Spread the word! Use your social networks to create a groundswell of support by tweeting the following message to the targets below:

Ensure #Syria Women at Geneva II peace talks. Follow #SWFP 7 Point Roadmap to Gender Sensitive Peace http://tinyurl.com/lovf7e4

  • @WhiteHouse (President Obama)
  • @JohnKerry (Secretary of State John Kerry)
  • @Rhodes44 (Ben Rhodes, Foreign Policy Advisor to President Obama)
  • @AmbassadorPower (Samantha Power, US Permanent Representative to the UN)
  • @S_GWI (Department of State, Global Office for Women’s Issues)
  • @LakhdarBrahimi
  • @UN_DPA
  • @UNICCairo
     
Letters: 

1)

Dear Mr. Secretary-General, Special Representative Brahimi, President Putin

I am concerned about the total lack of inclusion of women, especially those from civil society, in the Syrian peace processes. It has been nearly 14 years since the landmark passage of  UN Security Council resolution 1325 (UNSCR 1325) calling on UN member states to “increase the participation of women and incorporate gender perspectives in all United Nations peace and security efforts.” I urge you to do all that you can to ensure that women are able to fully participate in the 22 January 2014 Geneva II peace talks between the Syrian government and the opposition, the goal of which is to end the Syrian conflict and create a transitional government.

Exclusion of Syrian women from the peace process not only undermines the promotion and protection of women’s human rights, but also reduces chances for a sustainable peace and future development for all Syrians. In recent years, peace agreements around the world have fallen apart at a startling rate. Research and experience are increasingly pointing to one major explanation - the failure to include a broad range of stakeholders, especially women, in peace processes.

The Syrian Women’s Forum for Peace, representing 40 plus groups within Syria from a variety of political, social, ethnic, age, and education backgrounds has introduced a Seven Point Road Map to Gender Sensitive Peace Building Process in Syria. Their message is clear: women must be part of peacebuilding in Syria if there is to be any hope for democracy and peace.

Equality Now supports the Syrian Women’s Forum for Peace road map, based on a 7 Point Plan of Action introduced by the UN Secretary General in 2010 to track progress on women’s participation in peacebuilding, which calls for:

  • women’s participation in conflict resolution;
  • women’s participation in, and applied gender analysis to, all post-conflict planning processes;
  • post-conflict financing for gender equality and women and girl’s empowerment;
  • gender-responsive civilian capacity-building;
  • women’s representation in post-conflict governance;
  • the rule of law being upheld; and,
  • women’s involvement in the economic recovery with specific measures to achieve these necessary commitments by the international community and Syria.

I respectfully urge the United Nations and its member states to implement UNSCR 1325 and use all efforts to follow the road map for a gender sensitive peace building process and ensure the inclusion of women from Syrian civil society at Geneva II in January. The war has brought devastation to so many lives. The peace process with the integral participation of women will help ensure it never happens again. Doing so will help achieve dignity, respect for human rights and a sustainable peace for all Syrians.
 
Thank you for your attention.


2)

Dear Mr. President, Secretary Kerry,

I am concerned about the total lack of inclusion of women, especially those from civil society, in the Syrian peace processes. It has been nearly 14 years since the landmark passage of  UN Security Council resolution 1325 (UNSCR 1325) calling on UN member states, including the United States, to “increase the participation of women and incorporate gender perspectives in all United Nations peace and security efforts.” I urge you to do all that you can to ensure that women are able to fully participate in the 22 January 2014 Geneva II peace talks between the Syrian government and the opposition, the goal of which is to end the Syrian conflict and create a transitional government.

The US government has officially recognized the link between women, peace and security by implementing Security Council Resolution 1325 through the 2011 U.S. National Action Plan on Women Peace and Security (NAP). Exclusion of Syrian women from the peace process not only undermines the promotion and protection of women’s human rights, but also reduces chances for a sustainable peace and future development for all Syrians. In recent years, peace agreements around the world have fallen apart at a startling rate. Research and experience are increasingly pointing to one major explanation - the failure to include a broad range of stakeholders, especially women, in peace processes.

The Syrian Women’s Forum for Peace, representing 40 plus groups within Syria from a variety of political, social, ethnic, age, and education backgrounds, has introduced a Seven Point Road Map to Gender Sensitive Peace Building Process in Syria. Their message is clear: women must be part of peacebuilding in Syria if there is to be any hope for democracy and peace.

Equality Now supports the Syrian Women’s Forum for Peace road map, based on a 7 Point Plan of Action introduced by the UN Secretary General in 2010 to track progress on women’s participation in peacebuilding, which calls for:

  • women’s participation in conflict resolution;
  • women’s participation in, and applied gender analysis to, all post-conflict planning processes;
  • post-conflict financing for gender equality and women and girl’s empowerment;
  • gender-responsive civilian capacity-building;
  • women’s representation in post-conflict governance;
  • the rule of law being upheld; and,
  • women’s involvement in the economic recovery with specific measures to achieve these necessary commitments by the international community and Syria.

Through the NAP, the US commits to advocating for the integration of women and gender perspectives in negotiations concerning conflict resolution, peacebuilding, and political transitions. The war in Syria has brought devastation to so many lives and is the first test of this commitment. I respectfully urge the US government to live up to this commitment and use all efforts to follow the road map for a gender sensitive peace building process and ensure the inclusion of women from Syrian civil society at Geneva II. Doing so will help achieve dignity, respect for human rights and a sustainable peace for all Syrians.

Thank you for your attention.

Afghanistan: Peace and Security Undermined: Suspension of Malalai Joya from Parliament

Action Number: 
21.5
Update: 
UPDATE
Date: 
2007 Oct 1

Malalai JoyaMalalai Joya entered Afghanistan’s new Parliament in September 2005 pledging to “protect the rights of the oppressed and safeguard women’s rights.”  She won the second highest number of votes in Farah province, taking her seat in the Lower House (Wolesi Jirga).  A staunch critic of the warlords and defender of women’s rights, Malalai has consistently been stopped from speaking in Parliament or had speeches cut short, h

What You Can Do: 

Please write to the officials below calling for the reinstatement of Malalai Joya and a full investigation into the way she was excluded from representing her constituency and participating in parliamentary proceedings.  Remind them of the provisions of the Afghan Constitution that guarantee freedom of speech and women’s equality.  Insist that the right of Malalai Joya and all other Members of Parliament to peacefully express their views be protected and that procedures be put in place to prevent the suppression of free speech and democracy.  Call on these officials to ensure the personal safety of Malalai and all others seeking to protect and promote their full equal rights under the Constitution.

President Hamid Karzai
Gul Khana Palace
Presidential Palace
Kabul, Afghanistan
president@afghanistangov.org

Chief Justice Abdul Salam Azimi
Afghan Supreme Court
Charai Seahat Hama
Microyana
Kabul, Afghanistan

Yunus Qanooni, Speaker of the House
Afghanistan National Assembly
Wolesi Jirga
Kabul, Afghanistan

Please send copies of your letters to: 

Dr. Husn Banu Ghazanfar
Minister of Women’s Affairs
Ministry of Women’s Affairs
Shar-e-naw
Kabul, Afghanistan

Afghanistan: Access to Justice for Afghan Women—A New Chief Justice

Action Number: 
21.4
Update: 
UPDATE
Date: 
2006 Dec 1

In December 2004 Equality Now issued Women’s Action 21.3 to highlight issues affecting Afghan women’s access to justice.

What You Can Do: 

Please write to Chief Justice Azimi congratulating him on his appointment as Chief Justice, and urging him, together with the other Supreme Court judges, to take a leadership role in promoting and protecting the rights of women in accordance with Afghanistan’s Constitution and the international human rights standards, including CEDAW, to which Afghanistan is a party.  Reinforce the critical role they can play in enforcing equal protection of the law for women and sending a strong signal that violence against women in Afghanistan will not be tolerated.  Letters should be addressed to:

Chief Justice Abdul Salam Azimi
Afghan Supreme Court
Charai Seahat Hama
Microyana
Kabul, Afghanistan

with a copy to: 

Mr. Ghulam Sarwar Danish
Minister of Justice
Ministry of Justice
Pashtunistan Watt
Kabul, Afghanistan
Email: info@moj.gov.af  

Afghanistan: Access to Justice for Afghan Women

Action Number: 
21.3
Update: 
UPDATE
Date: 
2004 Dec 1

Afghan womenThree years since the formal end of the war and the removal of the Taliban from power, the situation in Afghanistan continues to threaten the safety, security, and human rights of Afghan citizens, particularly Afghan women.

What You Can Do: 

Please write to President Karzai and call on him to replace Chief Justice Shinwari, together with all other judges who are not prepared to uphold the provisions of Afghanistan’s Constitution and international law that provide for equality between men and women and prohibit all forms of discrimination. Urge President Karzai to appoint a new Chief Justice and ensure the appointment of Supreme Court judges who will uphold all the provisions of Afghanistan’s Constitution, including its prohibition of discrimination against women. Please send a copy of your letter to the Afghan Ambassador to your country.

President Hamid Karzai
The Palace
Protocol Office
Kabul
Afghanistan

Afghanistan: Peace, Security and the Role of Women

Action Number: 
21.2
Update: 
UPDATE
Date: 
2002 Apr 1

Several months after the overthrow of the Taliban, Afghan women are still unsafe in their own country. Large parts of Afghanistan are controlled by local warlords, competing for power and taking revenge for past injustices committed by the largely Pashtun Taliban. Women, particularly of the Pashtun ethnic group, are reportedly being subjected to widespread rapes, beatings, kidnappings and other forms of violence and intimidation.

What You Can Do: 

Please write to the President of the Security Council asking him to circulate your letter to the other Security Council members. Call on the Security Council to authorize the immediate expansion of UN-authorized security forces in Afghanistan and to post these forces throughout the country with a mandate to disarm warring factions. Please also write to the President of the United States, urging him to reverse United States opposition to the expansion of the security forces and noting the special responsibility of the United States Government to help rebuild Afghanistan following the destruction caused by US bombing in the war. Urge him also to ensure that the funding commitments made by the United States and other donor countries in Tokyo are honored and delivered without further delay. Letters should be addressed to:

Security Council President for July 2003
H.E. Mr. Inocencio F. Arias
Permanent Mission of Spain
823 United Nations Plaza
345 East 46th Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10017, USA
Fax: 1-212-949-7247
Email: spain@spainun.org

Security Council President for September 2003
Sir Jeremy Quentin Greenstock, KCMG
Permanent Mission of the United Kingdom
One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, 28th Floor
885 Second Avenue
New York, NY 10017, USA
Fax: 1-212-745-9316
Email: uk@un.int

Security Council President for August 2003
H.E. Dr. Mikhail Wehbe
Permanent Mission of the Syrian Arab Republic
820 Second Avenue, 15th Floor
New York, NY 10017, USA
Fax: 1-212-983-4439
E-mail syria@un.int

Security Council President for October 2003
H.E. John D. Negroponte
Permanent Mission of the United States
799 UN Plaza
New York, NY 10017, USA
Fax: 1-212-415-4443
Email: usa@un.int

Afghanistan: Terrorism, The Taliban and The Role of Women in Peace and Security

Action Number: 
21.1
Update: 
Not an update
Date: 
2001 Oct 1

On 11 September 2001, terrorists attacked the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon in Washington, DC, killing more than five thousand innocent people from more than eighty countries and adding the United States to the long list of nations that have suffered from terrorism. On 7 October 2001, the United States began bombing in Afghanistan, in a declared "war on terrorism" after the Taliban regime in Afghanistan failed to turn over Osama bin Laden, the prime suspect in the 11 September attacks.

What You Can Do: 

Please write to the President of the Security Council asking him/her to circulate your letter to the other Security Council members. Call on the Security Council to authorize collective action in Afghanistan by Member States of the United Nations, in consultation with Afghan women's organizations and other currently disempowered elements of civil society. Urge the Security Council to consider new and creative forms of intervention in accordance with its mandate under Chapter VII - to restore peace and maintain security, to contribute towards the reconstruction of Afghanistan and to undertake a long-term initiative designed to create an environment conducive to free and fair elections in Afghanistan with the participation of all people, including women, on the basis of equality.

Security Council President for November
H.E. Patricia Durrant
Permanent Mission of Jamaica
767 Third Avenue, 9th floor
New York, NY 10017
Fax: 212-935-7607
Email: jamaica@un.int

Security Council President for December
H.E. Moctar Ouane
Permanent Mission of the Republic of Mali
111 East 69th Street
New York, NY 10021
Fax: 212-472-3778
Email: mali@un.int

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