FGM

FGM: reporting of cases among children becomes mandatory (Guardian)

10/20/2015 -- The Guardian -- "FGM: reporting of cases among children becomes mandatory"

Under the new law, health and social-care professionals and teachers in England and Wales will be obliged to report all cases of known FGM in under-18s, whether it is disclosed by the victim or seen by the professional.

Global: Don’t leave girls behind – UN SDGs MUST have GLOBAL indicators on female genital mutilation & ‘child marriage’

Update: 
Not an update
Date: 
2015 Oct 20

TAKE ACTION NOW! << Click on this link to send all letters below online.

What You Can Do: 

TAKE ACTION NOW! << Click on this link to send all letters below online.

Join Equality Now and our partners Safe Hands for Girls, The Girl Generation, Inter-African Committee on Traditional Practices, and Global Woman PEACE Foundation in calling for SDGs with comprehensive global indicators on FGM and CEFM!

Letters should go to:

H.E. Mr. Oh Joon
President of the United Nations Economic and Social Council
Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Republic of Korea to the United Nations
335 East 45th Street
New York, N.Y. 10017
Email: korea.un@mofa.go.kr
 
H.E. Mr. Mogens Lykketoft
President of the 70th Session of the United Nations General Assembly
UN Headquarters
405 East 42nd Street
New York, NY, 10017
Facebook: www.facebook.com/lykketoft
Twitter: @lykketoft
 
Dr. Lisa Grace S. Bersales
National Statistician, Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA)
Co-Chair of the Inter-Agency and Expert Group on the Sustainable Development Goal Indicators
3/F PSA-CVEA Bldg.
East Avenue
Quezon City, 1101
Philippines
Fax: +63-02-462-6600
 
Mr. Enrique Ordaz
Director-General Integration, Analysis and Research
National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI)
Co-Chair of the Inter-Agency and Expert Group on the Sustainable Development Goal Indicators
Av. Héroe de Nacozari Sur
Núm. 2301
Fracc. Jardines del Parque
C.P. 20276
Aguascalientes, Ags.
México
Email: enrique.ordaz@inegi.org.mx
 
Ms. Wasmália Socorro Barata Bivar
President of the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statics (IBGE)
Chair of the United Nations Statistical Commission
Av. Franklin Roosevelt
166/10°andar, Castelo
20021-120 Rio de Janeiro – RJ
Brasil

 

Letters: 

Dear […]

I was very pleased to learn that the Inter-Agency Expert Group (IAEG) removed the restriction to measure FGM only in “relevant countries” and that the United Nations Statistical Commission approved this indicator. Eliminating female genital mutilation and child marriage, globally, are crucial to sustainable development, gender equality and ensuring “that all human beings can enjoy prosperous and fulfilling lives.”

Right now, more than 700 million women and girls are living with the damaging effects of FGM and CEFM and millions more are at risk of both as FGM is often an immediate pre-cursor to CEFM. Though often hidden, both human rights violations can be found in nearly every country in the world. Therefore, global indicators are critical to holding states accountable to achieving the commitments, as what gets measured gets done. If the FGM indicator is limited to only specific countries or eliminated completely, millions of women and girls will remain invisible and uncounted and continue to suffer as a result, relevant data on the on the agreed target won’t be collected and we won’t know if states are actually making progress or which interventions are most effective.

The SDGs will guide global development and funding until 2030. I respectfully request the United Nations Economic and Social Council and General Assembly to formally adopt the global indicators for both FGM and CEFM in 2016. As there is still pushback by some Member States to retain the global indicator on FGM, I also ask the UN Statistical Commission and IAEG to ensure the indicator remains global in scope and applies to all Member States. Let’s not leave any girl or woman behind.

Thank you for your attention.

Sincerely,

United States: Protect Women and Girls from Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

Update: 
Not an update
Date: 
2015 Jul 20

TAKE ACTION NOW! << Click on this link to send all letters below online.

What You Can Do: 

TAKE ACTION NOW! << Click on this link to send all letters below online.

Please join Equality Now and Safe Hands for Girls in calling to protect at-risk women and girls in the U.S. and to ensure much-needed support and services for those living with the consequences of FGM.

  • Call on President Obama and all relevant federal agencies to ensure efforts to address FGM are sustainable in the long-term.
  • If you live in the United States, check whether your state has a law against FGM. If not, please contact your state representatives and urge them to enact laws and policies in line with the federal anti-FGM law. Find your state representatives here and use our letter or one of your own.
  • Know the facts - learn more about FGM in the U.S.
  • Help spread the word! Share this campaign and the following messages (you can also share messages from Equality Now’s Twitter and Facebook):

Letters should go to:

President Barack Obama
Office of the President
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500
United States of America
Email: president@whitehouse.gov
Twitter: @BarackObama

Cc:
Tina Tchen, Executive Director, White House Council on Women and Girls (cwg@who.eop.gov)
Caroline “Carrie” Bettinger-Lopez, White House Advisor on Violence Against Women (vaw@ovp.eop.gov)
Sylvia Mathews Burwell, Secretary of Health and Human Services (Sylvia.Burwell@hhs.gov)
León Rodríguez, Director, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security (Public.Engagement@uscis.dhs.gov)
Teresa McHenry, Chief, Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section, Department of Justice (teresa.mchenry@usdoj.gov)
Arne Duncan, Secretary of Education (arne.duncan@ed.gov)
Cathy Russell, Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues (keittvp2@state.gov)

Letters: 

Dear President Obama,

I thank you for, and also urge you to continue, your work to protect women and girls in the U.S. who are at risk of  or who are living with the consequences of female genital mutilation (FGM). FGM—the cutting or removal of external female genitalia—violates girls’ and women’s rights to equality, life, security, dignity, and freedom from discrimination and torture. According to a 2016 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study, up to 513,000 girls and women in the U.S. have undergone or are at risk of being subjected to FGM!

The U.S. made several commitments to address FGM domestically and abroad, and U.S. laws and policies recognize FGM as a human rights violation and extreme form of violence against girls and women. I applaud your efforts and those of other U.S. agencies to live up to those commitments and to end FGM in the U.S. I also want to make sure that the work to protect at-risk women and girls continues during this Administration and beyond. Eliminating FGM in the U.S. requires a comprehensive government-wide strategy that will last beyond this administration. Each of the agencies working to address FGM also need sustainable Congressional funding in order to continue their efforts, including engaging with survivors, diaspora and local civil society organizations, as well as encouraging and supporting state efforts to end FGM at local levels across the U.S.

I urge you to protect at-risk women and girls in the U.S. and to provide much-needed support and services for those living with the consequences of FGM, all sustainable in the long-term.

Thank you for your attention.

Yours sincerely,



Letter to state representatives:

Dear   ,

I urge you to stand up for women and girls in your state and ensure they are protected from female genital mutilation (FGM). FGM—the cutting or removal of external female genitalia—violates girls’ and women’s rights to equality, life, security, dignity, and freedom from discrimination and torture. According to a 2016 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study, up to 513,000 girls and women in the U.S. have undergone or are at risk of being subjected to FGM.

U.S. laws and policies recognize female genital mutilation (FGM) as a human rights violation and extreme form of violence against girls and women. Legislation criminalizing the practice as well as taking a child outside the country to perform it – a practice known as “vacation cutting” – coupled with education and awareness raising are critical in order to protect women and girls in the U.S. who are at risk of FGM or who are living with its consequences in the U.S.

Federal law prohibits performing FGM in the U.S. or vacation cutting. But currently only 24 states have a law against FGM, and not all of them have closed the loophole for “vacation cutting.” I call on you to review your state’s legislation to ensure your state’s law is in line with federal law and also that your state’s policies provide for education and awareness raising on FGM at the local level. If needed, please take the lead in drafting and introducing relevant legislation to strengthen your state’s laws and policies so that at-risk women and girls can access protections and support at local levels. This will send a strong message that your state is committed to protecting human rights and preventing violence against women and girls.

Thank you for your attention.

Yours sincerely,

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