Discrimination in law

Jordan moves towards ending discrimination against women and their children in nationality laws (Thomson Reuters)

11/12/2014 -- Thomson Reuters -- "Jordan moves towards ending discrimination against women and their children in nationality laws"

"Nationality laws can be complex, but removing discrimination between men and women is not a complicated concept." - Suad Abu-Dayyeh, Equality Now's Middle East and North Africa Consultant. [read more...]

500 Days and Counting (Daily Beast)

8/20/2014 -- Daily Beast -- "500 Days and Counting" The millennium development goals expire in 500 days. Equality Now's Shelby Quast asks what still needs be achieved when it comes to gender equality.

Suriname, latest nation to let mothers pass nationality to children (Thomson Reuters)

8/14/2014 -- Thomson Reuters -- "Suriname, latest nation to let mothers pass nationality to children"

Late last month, Suriname joined a growing list of countries which have agreed to update their laws to allow mothers to pass their nationality to their children, and men to confer their nationality on their wives – as well as to close gaps which could make children stateless. [read more...]

Ending child marriage helps break cycle of violence and discrimination (Girls Not Brides)

2/18/2014 -- Girls Not Brides -- "Ending child marriage helps break cycle of violence and discrimination"

Liloe was 14 when she fled to the Tasaru Rescue Centre in Narok, Kenya to escape #FGM and early marriage. Staff from the centre, which is supported by Equality Now, with funds from Comic Relief, arranged a reconciliation with her family and her mother made a promise not to mutilate her or marry her off.

Saudi Arabia said to reassess ban on women drivers (Arabian Business)

11/29/2013 -- Arabian Business -- "Saudi Arabia said to reassess ban on women drivers" Equality Now's Suad Abu-Dayyeh:

"Under the Saudi Arabian male guardianship system, women are vulnerable to a wide range of discrimination in both private and public life and have limited decision-making authority and freedom of movement,” she said.

Egypt: Ensure Women’s Full Participation in the Constitutional Process and Promote their Rights

Update: 
Not an update
Date: 
2013 Sep 18

7 FEBRUARY 2014 UPDATE: On 14 and 15 January 2014, Egyptians approved a new Constitution which contains provisions guaranteeing equality between men and women. Our partners in Egypt welcome the new Constitution, but are working to ensure these provisions are strongly implemented, particularly in the current climate where the justice system faces considerable challenges.


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What You Can Do: 

TAKE ACTION NOW! << Click on this link to send all letters below online.

Please call on Egyptian authorities to heed the voices of Egyptian women, in line with Egypt’s obligations under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, to ensure full equality between men and women. Urge them to:

  • change the composition of the 50-member constitutional committee so that women are better represented, with a minimum level of 35%, and ask them to employ a selection process that is representative, transparent and fair and reflects the rights of all of Egypt’s citizens.
  • form a women’s rights committee to assist the 50-member committee in incorporating women's rights in the Constitution. This committee should include the expertise of a wide-range of women, from feminist civil society and the women's movement, rather than just women representatives of political parties.

Letters should go to:

Interim President Adly Mansour
El Etahadiya Presidential Palace
Merghiny St., Heliopolis
Cairo, EGYPT
Fax & Tel.: +202 239 019 980
Twitter: @EgyPresidency

Prime Minister Ibrahim Mehleb
Magless El Shaàb Street, Al Kasr El Einy
Cairo, EGYPT
Tel.: +202-2793-5000
Fax: +202-2795-8048
Email: pm@cabinet.gov.eg

With a copy to:

Amre Moussa, President of the Constitutional Committee
Email: amremoussa@gmail.com

Letters: 

Dear President, Prime Minister:

cc: President of the Constitutional Committee

I am concerned about the ongoing exclusion of women from the constitutional process. By announcing a 50-member constitutional review committee with only 10% of the places reserved for “women and youth,” your government has continued to ignore women’s demands and limited their full participation, especially as the small number of positions have been mainly filled by government representatives. Unless women and girls are treated as real partners in deciding the future of Egypt, they will suffer the immediate consequences, and in the long-term, Egyptian society will as well.

I also understand that there were no women at all, let alone experts in women’s rights, on the 10-member so-called expert committee that worked in secret to prepare recommendations on constitutional amendments for the 50-member constitutional committee. Drafts of the proposals leaked to the media are giving Egyptian women cause for alarm by apparently rolling back on achievements already made for women.

I therefore urge you to support the promotion and protection of women’s human rights by ensuring a broad base of participation from all sections of society in the 50-member constitutional committee. More specifically, please give due regard to women’s needs and aspirations by changing the composition of the constitutional committee to include expert women’s participation, including from civil society, at a minimum level of 35%. Please also form a women’s rights committee to assist the 50-member committee in incorporating women's rights in the Constitution. This committee should include the expertise of a wide-range of women, from feminist civil society and the women's movement, rather than just female representatives of political parties.

Also consider Egyptian women’s groups additional proposals to ensure a transparent, democratic and well-informed process, including: 

  • women’s participation of at least 35% at all levels of decision-making, including the executive, legislative and judicial authorities (which should be enshrined in the Constitution) and women’s representation in all offices and all specialties of the presidency.
  • compliance with, and guarantee that the Constitution respects, all international treaties that protect the rights of women and men.
  • preservation of the social and economic rights achieved by women in their previous struggles and a guarantee of their ability to attain them.
  • establishment of full citizenship rights and the rule of law that will lead to the revocation of all forms of discrimination based on sex, age, marital status, class, ideological affiliation, etc.

Undertaking these steps will help Egypt comply with its obligations under international law, including the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

Thank you for your attention.

Sincerely Yours,

Bahamas reviews nationality laws that discriminate against women (Thomson Reuters)

6/27/2013 -- Thomson Reuters -- "Bahamas reviews nationality laws that discriminate against women"; Flawed nationality laws are one of the biggest causes of statelessness and can create huge heartache for families. "You are really a non-person so it’s very, very difficult to live your life. You’re vulnerable all the time and you don’t see a future out of it.

Saudi women jailed for trying to help Canadian woman (Toronto Star)

6/18/2013 -- Toronto Star -- "Saudi women jailed for trying to help a Canadian"; Middle East/North Africa consultant Suad Abu-Dayyeh comments on the case of women’s rights activists Wajeha Al-Huwaider and Fawzia Al-Oyouni:

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