Jordan

Global Nationality Review: The Real Human Cost of Discriminatory Laws (HuffPo UK)

1/21/2013 -- Huffington Post UK -- "Global Nationality Review: The Real Human Cost of Discriminatory Laws"; London Office Director Jacqui Hunt discusses our new global report on nationality and citizenship laws, which discriminate on the basis of sex.

Jordan: Give women equal citizenship rights to men

Update: 
Not an update
Date: 
2012 Nov 5

UPDATE 27 JANUARY 2014: On 12 January 2014, the Government of Jordan gave approval to grant the foreign spouses of Jordanian women and their children certain civil rights, including residence permits and improved access to state medical care facilities, education and work in the private sector. These rights will considerably alleviate the hardships of the affected families, and we urge the government to implement them without delay.

What You Can Do: 

 

TAKE ACTION NOW! << Click on this link to send all letters below online.

Call on Jordanian government officials to amend the Nationality Law to give Jordanian women the equal right to pass their nationality on to their children and spouses without delay.

King Abdullah II bin Al-Hussein
King’s Office
11100 Amman, JORDAN
Tel: +9626 4637341
Fax: +9626 4627421/2

Prime Minister Abdallah El Nsour

11180 Amman, JORDAN

Tel: +9626 4641211

Fax: +9626 4642520

Email: info@pm.gov.jo

Call on the Minister of the Interior to accelerate governmental efforts to facilitate provision of residence permits to foreign spouses of Jordanian women and access to health and education services for their children, until the Nationality Law is amended.

Mr. Hussein Al-Majali
Minister of the Interior
P.O. Box 100, 11181 Amman
Ibin Zawdun St., Building #9, JORDAN
Tel.: +9626 5691141/Fax: +9626 5691141
Email: info@moi.gov.jo

Letters: 

TO THE KING & PRIME MINISTER:

Dear King, Prime Minister:

I am writing to express my support for the men and women in Jordan advocating for women to be given equal citizenship rights with men, in particular the “My mother is Jordanian, and her nationality is a right for me” campaign organized by Nima Habashna. Under Jordanian Law No.6 of 1954 on Nationality, last amended in 1987, with few exceptions, women cannot transmit their nationality to their non-Jordanian husbands or to the children they have together, which is negatively impacting their lives. I respectfully request that you do all you can to amend the Nationality Law without delay to remove this prohibition and thereby improve the lives of these families immeasurably.

Hardships caused by the inability of a Jordanian woman to pass on her nationality include the fear that children will be taken out of the country by her non-Jordanian husband leaving her with huge legal difficulties in getting access to them, exploitation by employers of foreign-born men and their children, and the urge to marry off girls at a very young age to Jordanians to gain security. Additional restrictions, such as where children from these unions can work or study, in access to government hospitals and the need to obtain Ministry of the Interior approval to marry, are all contributing to the increased vulnerability of these women and their families.

Though Jordanian law allows for the possibility of naturalization of a non-national husband and their children, it is at the discretion of the Council of Ministers and applications must be obtained and filed in person with the Ministry of the Interior based in Amman. No woman in the campaign has even managed to have her petition considered and sometimes women are unable even to obtain an application.

The Arab Women Organization brought the issue to the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) in February 2012. In its concluding observations in July 2012, CEDAW urged the government “to enable Jordanian women to pass their nationality to their foreign spouses and their mutual children” within the context of nationality rights. Several other UN treaties and treaty monitoring bodies including the Human Rights Committee, the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) and the Committee on the Rights of the Child have also addressed this issue. All of these committees in their most recent review of Jordan’s implementation of their respective human rights treaties have urged your government to amend its nationality law.

Please act urgently to amend the Nationality Law. In the interim I also urge you to work with the Ministry of the Interior to accelerate efforts to facilitate provision of residence permits to foreign spouses of Jordanian women and regular access to health and education services for their children so that such families have temporary respite from the hardships of the current law. 

Thank you for your attention.

Sincerely,


TO THE MINISTER OF THE INTERIOR:

Dear Minister,

I am writing to express my support for the men and women in Jordan who are advocating for the amendment of Jordanian Law No. 6 of 1954 to give Jordanian women married to non-nationals the equal right with Jordanian men to pass their citizenship on to their spouses and children. Until the Nationality Law is amended, please also accelerate governmental efforts to facilitate provision of residence permits to foreign spouses of Jordanian women and access to health and education services for their children so that such families have temporary respite from the non-implementation of the naturalization provisions of the current law.

Some of the hardships caused by the inability of Jordanian women to pass on their nationality include real fears that their children will be taken from the country by the non-Jordanian husband with no way for the woman to bring them back, exploitation by employers of foreign-born men and their children, and the inclination to marry off girls at a very young age to Jordanians to gain security. Additional restrictions, such as where children from these unions can work or study, in access to government hospitals, and the need to obtain approval from your office to marry, are all contributing to the increased vulnerability of these women and their families.

Though Jordanian law allows for the possibility of naturalization of a non-national husband and their children, this is only at the discretion of the Council of Ministers and applications must be obtained and filed in person with your Ministry in Amman. Nima Habashna, the organizer of the campaign, “My mother is Jordanian, and her nationality is a right for me,” for example, submitted an application several years ago. However, despite repeated attempts to obtain a decision, and even with the assistance of a Parliamentarian who submitted papers on her behalf, she has never directly received an official written response. It was only this past April that the Parliamentarian received notification that Nima’s application was rejected, but without any explanation as to why. Other women in the campaign have also tried to have their children and spouses naturalized but are unable to even obtain an application from your Ministry. No woman in the campaign has yet managed to have her petition considered.

Please support the amendment of the Nationality Law, in accordance with Jordan’s international legal obligations, and do all that you can to facilitate provision of residence permits to foreign spouses of Jordanian women and regular access to health and education services for their children until then.

Thank you for your attention.

Sincerely,

Jordan: National Efforts to Confront "Honor Killings" and to Protect Women from Violence

Update: 
UPDATE
Date: 
2002 Nov 1

Honor KillingsIn January 2002, two brothers from Jordan were given a three-month prison sentence for killing their sister Safa Samir on 7 July 2001. When Safa returned to her home on 6 July she confessed to her family that she had engaged in sexual activity with a man. That day her brother Anas Samir tried to kill her with an axe in the backyard of the family's home. Safa was admitted briefly to the hospital.

What You Can Do: 

Please write to the Minister of Social Development, reminding her of the Jordanian government's commitment to protect the right to life and security of all its people and of the previous Minister's pledge to open a national women's shelter. Commend discussions held to date and the positive steps the government has taken to combat domestic violence, in particular under the auspices of the Family Protection Project. Urge her to support women under threat of violence and at risk of being killed by acting immediately to open shelters for women in Jordan.

Please also write to the Minister of Justice, welcoming the amendment of Article 340 and the recent decision of the Court of Cassation in the case of Fawaz Syouf, but noting with concern the continuing practice of "honor" killings and the way in which Articles 97 and 98 are used to mitigate punishment for these killings. Ask him to take steps to ensure that judges apply the law appropriately and do not use Articles 97 and 98, or Article 340, to allow the justification of "honor" killings. Request him to ensure the courts hold those who commit "honor" crimes properly accountable and that sentences handed down reflect the severity of the crime. Letters should be addressed to:

Her Excellency Dr Rowaida Maatiah
Minister of Social Development
P.O. Box 6720
Amman, JORDAN
Fax: +962-6-593-0687

His Excellency Faris Al-Nabulsi
Minister of Justice
P.O. Box 4060
Amman, JORDAN
Fax: +962-6-464-6388

Jordan: National Efforts to Confront "Honor Killings" and to Protect Women from Violence

Update: 
Not an update
Date: 
2000 Dec 1

Honor killingsOne woman was knifed to death because she wanted to continue her education and refused to marry the man chosen for her by her family. Another woman was shot five times because she ran away from her husband who continually beat and raped her. Another was strangled on her wedding night when her husband discovered she was no longer a virgin.

What You Can Do: 

Please write to the Speaker of the Lower House of Parliament, urging him to support and to encourage other Members of Parliament to support all necessary amendments to the Penal Code so that it guarantees equality and justice and protects the value of all human life. Note that "honor killings" are a violation of fundamental human rights, including the right to life and to security of person, and the right to equal protection under the law.

Please also write to the Minister of Social Development expressing concern over the lack of shelters and other support services for women. Urge her to protect these women by establishing shelters and allowing non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to establish shelters, and by implementing adequate support services around the country for women under threat of violence and at risk of being killed.

His Excellency Abd al-Hadi al-Majali
Speaker of the Lower House of Parliament
P.O. Box 72
Amman, JORDAN
Fax: 962-6-568-5970

Her Excellency Tamam al-Ghwol
Ministry of Social Development
P.O. Box 6720
Amman, JORDAN
Fax: 962-6-593-0687

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